Author Topic: Who works in IT  (Read 16975 times)

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Offline jgillmanjr

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Who works in IT
« on: May 20, 2013, 04:43:48 PM »
Alright, I know a couple people here (including myself) work in IT.

Fess up to what you do  ;)

I'm a Technical Sales Engineer (Design Engineer) for a hosting company in Lansing called Liquid Web. With that said, I'm moving to the QA department.

What about you?
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Offline bigt8261

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2013, 05:22:42 PM »
Internal Web/DB development for a company in the Grand Rapids area.

Offline linux203

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Who works in IT
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2013, 09:11:14 PM »
Systems Engineer at a Fortune 500 bank in Auburn Hills.

eDirectory, Active Directory, ZENWorks, and Systems Center Configuration Manager. Other duties as assigned.
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Then He said to them, “But now, he who has a money bag, let him take it, and likewise a knapsack; and he who has no sword, let him sell his garment and buy one."  Luke 22:36

Offline gryphon

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2013, 10:40:40 PM »
I don't currently work in IT, but in the past I have been responsible for some of my Fortune 500's IT infrastructure.  In fact, I designed and managed the installation of a fiber backbone for one of our Lansing campuses.  There are some other things as well, but I am most happy about some of the software I have written that is (or at least was) in use across the world.   Several projects were publicly reviewed in magazines and scientific journals. Those are separate from my current employment.  I multitask.  :)

Currently I am a PM.

Offline Ezerharden

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2013, 11:14:00 PM »
Currently I am a PM.

Would that be Private Message or Parts Manager?  ;D
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Offline fozzy71

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2013, 11:15:14 PM »
Would that be Private Message or Parts Manager?  ;D

I would assume it is Project Manager given where he works.

Offline gryphon

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2013, 12:15:22 AM »
Project Manager.  :)

Offline Ezerharden

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2013, 01:17:47 AM »
Ok that would have been my guess after Prime Minister  ::)
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Offline TheQ

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Who works in IT
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2013, 08:52:27 AM »
I run a theft administration IT system that runs in SAP for the criminal gang known as the "State of Michigan".
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Offline bigt8261

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2013, 09:07:32 AM »
I run a theft administration IT system that runs in SAP for the criminal gang known as the "State of Michigan".

Do us all a favor and miss some mundane detail.

Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2013, 10:18:51 AM »
Jeez,

Now I feel inadequate on the coding side of things.

I do PHP work for proof of concept stuff and other utility type stuff. Not a pro by any stretch of the imagination.

Probably the most "pro" thing I've done to date is write a PHP library to interface with our Storm API
https://code.google.com/p/storm-api-php-library/
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2013, 03:38:09 AM »
Probably the most "pro" thing I've done to date is write a PHP library to interface with our Storm API

I remember the early days of personal computing with fondness, of writing and freely sharing libraries.  Of course, this was before M$ knew what that was.  Yes, I am one of those Amiga/Unix assholes people that was doing modern computing on an Amiga platform in the mid-80's when PC people were arguing the merits of amber screens v. green screens and Mac people were learning Apple's obsequious and infinitely inferior OS and UI.  I was doing 4,096 colors and a Motorola 68000 in 1985.  PC people were bragging about their Dhrystone ratings, but not only couldn't their computers do crap, they couldn't themselves.  PCs and Macs were so inferior that it was like being fluent in multiple languages and having modern writing and publishing tools (Amiga) and dealing with infants who could barely speak and wrote by chiseling in stone tablets (IBM and Mac).  I began writing C in 1986, but wrote assembler in several flavors before that and the first computer I used was an IBM 360 mainframe using Fortran IV in 1974.  I was running X Windows (er, excuse me, the X Window System) remotely from home on MSU engineering Sun and HP servers in the early 1990's when Microsoft was pushing Windows 3.0 and 3.1.  lmfao  I was also running BSD-Unix on my Amiga in the early 1990's, mostly for an 800-level OS course where I had to tear it apart and rebuild it.  Because I was running a superior computing platform I could do this from home.  Everyone else who had PCs and Macs lived at school in the engineering and CS labs.  lol

Some people reading this have no idea what I'm talking about.  Comparing AmigaOS with MSDOS-Windows/MacOS is like comparing a modern fighter jet (AmigaOS) with a biplane (MSDOS-Windows/MacOS).  Adding on the X Windows client just makes the equation that much more unbalanced.

As much as I admire Dave Ramsey, I disagree with him on Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, especially Bill Gates.  M$ set the personal computing world BACK twenty years.

I have also written a few small programs in Smalltalk against my will (as well as ported Smalltalk to Amiga.  I hate Smalltalk).  I have pondered the idea of learning Python for several years.  Maybe when I retire I can have fun again.

Oh, yeah, there is no reason for C++ or any derivatives.  You can't improve on C's simplicity, power, and perfection.  C++ and derivatives are a solution to a non-existent problem.  Kinda like our government.  But then C++ was developed by a Dane.  What would you expect?  A nanny state in computing.

Yeah, I have opinions on this stuff.   :)
« Last Edit: May 30, 2013, 03:50:18 PM by gryphon »

Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2013, 09:27:51 AM »
OOP is useful for some things, and overkill for others.

I should probably acquire a copy of K&R C at some point and actually learn it.
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2013, 11:58:26 PM »
God bless us, each and every one!



(I actually have two copies of this, one pre-ANSI.  The post-ANSI one [above] I've rarely opened and looks like brand new). 
« Last Edit: May 31, 2013, 12:08:17 AM by gryphon »

Offline TheQ

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2013, 12:08:26 AM »
It's not OOP, but I like Perl.
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2013, 04:34:24 AM »
I'd like to keep this thread going.  To me it is one of the most interesting ones we've had here for some time.  ;D

One time I was hired to write software that would manipulate a very narrow focus range camera in the X, Y, and Z directions. The camera was servo motor controlled. My software allowed for gear backlash. Each position of the camera would result in a photo. Anything above or below the photo’s focus point would be so out of focus as to be invisible. The camera would work through the subject top to bottom so to speak. The resulting images would be stitched together into an animation.

I created a simple user interface where someone could enter X, Y, and Z values in window fields, but I also wrote a C interpreter (some here know what interpreters and compilers are and the difference) that a user could utilize to customize their own routine by writing a simple C program and having the software follow their program. It was quite powerful.

The subject matter was injection molding. We would use clear material with carbon fibers to show flow. Different temperatures and injection pressures would reveal different patterns. All this data could be analyzed to reveal best results for producing consumer parts such as automobile fascias and other parts.

Interestingly enough, one of the leading injection molding companies flew in from California, checked this out, and was surprised by the results. Unfortunately they used what they saw to improve their own fabrication process free of charge.

1993. I remember it well. (If anyone cares, I did it using Amiga computers. IBMs and Macs were inferior platforms. The UI looked like something you’d see today).  This was written up in at least one scientific journal that I know of--a French science journal, no less.

Here's a modern human body equivalent of what I did (MRI I think).  Kinda neat, eh?



I would be interested if other people followed up with their own stories.  I can add a couple more.  I know there are some techies here.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 06:32:11 AM by gryphon »

Offline CV67PAT

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2013, 11:14:57 AM »
I have IT experience too.

Sent from my Commodore VIC-20 using hunt and peck.
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Offline TheQ

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Who works in IT
« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2013, 01:08:58 PM »

I have IT experience too.

Sent from my Commodore VIC-20 using hunt and peck.

And a dumb phone.

Maybe at some point you ran some Cat5 cable...?
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Offline CV67PAT

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2013, 01:30:07 PM »
And a dumb phone.

Maybe at some point you ran some Cat5 cable...?
Actually I ran some CAT6 cable on Thursday for camera use.

And my phone isn't so dumb now that I have upgraded it with that new speed dial feature.
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Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2013, 01:48:15 PM »
I'd like to keep this thread going.  To me it is one of the most interesting ones we've had here for some time.  ;D

One time I was hired to write software that would manipulate a very narrow focus range camera in the X, Y, and Z directions. The camera was servo motor controlled. My software allowed for gear backlash. Each position of the camera would result in a photo. Anything above or below the photo’s focus point would be so out of focus as to be invisible. The camera would work through the subject top to bottom so to speak. The resulting images would be stitched together into an animation.

I created a simple user interface where someone could enter X, Y, and Z values in window fields, but I also wrote a C interpreter (some here know what interpreters and compilers are and the difference) that a user could utilize to customize their own routine by writing a simple C program and having the software follow their program. It was quite powerful.

The subject matter was injection molding. We would use clear material with carbon fibers to show flow. Different temperatures and injection pressures would reveal different patterns. All this data could be analyzed to reveal best results for producing consumer parts such as automobile fascias and other parts.

Interestingly enough, one of the leading injection molding companies flew in from California, checked this out, and was surprised by the results. Unfortunately they used what they saw to improve their own fabrication process free of charge.

1993. I remember it well. (If anyone cares, I did it using Amiga computers. IBMs and Macs were inferior platforms. The UI looked like something you’d see today).  This was written up in at least one scientific journal that I know of--a French science journal, no less.

Here's a modern human body equivalent of what I did (MRI I think).  Kinda neat, eh?



I would be interested if other people followed up with their own stories.  I can add a couple more.  I know there are some techies here.

Dan,

That's interesting. What kind of optics were you using? Sounds like some wide open aperture action, or mad macro level.

Interesting the mention about the C interpreter. I'm assuming the time savings of being able to quickly write and use the code outweighed the performance benefits of actually compiling the code?

By formal education, my area is information systems, rather than straight up coding. That said,I was always the go to code monkey when that sort of thing was required.

My only real claim to fame is being second author on a teaching case that my advisor had published in the Journal of Information Systems Education. I basically did the data model and some other stuff.

I've picked up one of those Arduino units, but don't really have any other electronics to interface it with.

With that said, I have registered http://www.opensourceavionics.com - at some point when I get the time and money, I'd like to proof out some open source avionics platform (I have my pilots license).
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Offline CV67PAT

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2013, 03:22:08 PM »
Dan,

That's interesting. What kind of optics were you using? Sounds like some wide open aperture action, or mad macro level.

No it's just something he was dicking around with.
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #21 on: June 04, 2013, 12:53:37 AM »
Dan,

That's interesting. What kind of optics were you using? Sounds like some wide open aperture action, or mad macro level.
It's been 20 years, I couldn't tell you the specifics.  Not that I know all of them.  I was just hired to write the software.  The lens had a very wide aperture, so the depth of focus was extremely narrow.  I mean EXTREMELY.  It was a scientific camera designed for that type of use.
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Interesting the mention about the C interpreter. I'm assuming the time savings of being able to quickly write and use the code outweighed the performance benefits of actually compiling the code?
As you might surmise, writing a compiler wasn't an issue.  Compiling wouldn't have sped things up, and it wouldn't have assisted my task.  I needed a vehicle to convey instructions, and since C is so nakedly powerful with minimal code, and since my user would know C, it seemed like the natural method to create a task routine.  I also provided a C "checker" (kind of like a C pre-processor, or CPP if you are familiar with C compiling) that would test for invalid C code so one could make sure their routine was good before finding out two hours into a three hour run that you had an error!  I thought of everything, or at least I tried to.  I never heard one single complaint about the software or user manual I wrote.  Last I knew it was still in use, although that has been a while.  I'm sure now it is not.  Not because it has been replaced.  I'd bet my next paycheck no one has done anything like that since.  But just because people don't use that platform any more.
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My only real claim to fame is being second author on a teaching case that my advisor had published in the Journal of Information Systems Education. I basically did the data model and some other stuff.
Not really sure what that entailed.  I never had an adviser.  Well, I checked with one the last semester before I graduated to make sure I was going to graduate, but otherwise I stayed clear of them.  I did approach a prof one day about doing an independent study.  I was writing an Amiga 2D/3D graphing library (full color, of course) on my own, and thought I could parlay that into an independent study class taking a certain mathematical program's output and graphing it like Maple.  This was before a certain mathematical program had the capabilities it does now.   I am talking about doing all of this as an undergrad.  Although I did start my grad degree, I never bothered finishing.  As a single father I had three kids to take care of.
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I've picked up one of those Arduino units, but don't really have any other electronics to interface it with. 
I was not familiar with that until I looked it up just now.  Experiment on your own.  I've etched my own circuit boards.   I've designed my own breadboards.  In fact, that's another thing I did, write my own digital circuit simulation software that, last I counted, had users on four continents (that I know of). Australia would have been number five, but never heard anything from them so...

Go for it.  I remember back in the late 80's/early 90's I was going to write programmable logic controller software along the lines of an Allen Bradley 584/984 with real world I/O.  I never got around to it.  It would have been fun.  And relatively easy I think.  Plus, no equivalent to this day ever existed in the PC or Mac world that I am aware of.  Thus it would have been extremely useful in both teaching/training and real world control.  Only your imagination hinders you.  Life is just too short, and some things you can't put off or technology outpaces you.  For me, work, music, and a bad marriage got in the way.

IMO the best way to learn is to give yourself a project.  For example, design your own Christmas light display like you see on youtube videos.  It doesn't have to be that powerful, but make a simple version of that.  That will give you experience in crafting a user-friendly graphical software interface as well as designing and building a real world hardware interface.  You will begin to learn the real issues that are involved between hardware and software and with creating a product.  Just solving the human interface issues alone will be a big step.

After you get a couple of simple projects like that under your belt, go for it.  The world is your oyster.

[insert Frankie Goes to Hollywood reference here]
« Last Edit: June 04, 2013, 02:45:50 AM by gryphon »

Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #22 on: June 04, 2013, 09:07:55 AM »
Quote
Not really sure what that entailed.  I never had an adviser.  Well, I checked with one the last semester before I graduated to make sure I was going to graduate, but otherwise I stayed clear of them.  I did approach a prof one day about doing an independent study.  I was writing an Amiga 2D/3D graphing library (full color, of course) on my own, and thought I could parlay that into an independent study class taking a certain mathematical program's output and graphing it like Maple.  This was before a certain mathematical program had the capabilities it does now.   I am talking about doing all of this as an undergrad.  Although I did start my grad degree, I never bothered finishing.  As a single father I had three kids to take care of.

Well, my adviser at cmich was also a prof I had for a few classes. Actually, this teaching case was for an independent study, as I didn't really want to do anything more with SAP (The IS program at cmich is *huge* on SAP).

For shits and giggles, here's a copy of the article. Note: This doesn't have the proof of concept system I designed for this teaching case - I think that's something you can get if you subscribed to JISE. My prof wanted me to do it in access (it hurt, trust me). If you want it though, let me know and I can dig it up.

As for further formal education, meh. Not sure what I'd want to do. Really not sure if a Masters would help at all other than drain my bank account. I figure if anything, I'd try and get a high LSAT score to shoot for a full ride at Cooley, but that's about it (and Law isn't something I'd want to do full time).

Quote
IMO the best way to learn is to give yourself a project.

I can't agree with you more on this!

Small projects are how I ended up getting proficient with PHP. The PHP Library for Storm On Demand is how I ended up learning the OO side of it.

One of the other LTs in my unit got his EE degree from Western. He was a cadet up until december. He had to do something with a toyota prius. I recommended the Arduino unit, which his group ended up using for some control stuff. Might tinker around with my Buick if I end up going on this deployment and getting the cash for another car.
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Offline linux203

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2013, 09:06:46 AM »
Systems Engineer at a Fortune 500 bank in Auburn Hills.

eDirectory, Active Directory, ZENWorks, and Systems Center Configuration Manager. Other duties as assigned.

Scratch that... Friday is my last day.  I'll be a Linux SysAdmin in Okemos on Monday. 

Planned change of course.  Time to leave Metro Detroit. 
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Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2013, 09:25:27 AM »
Scratch that... Friday is my last day.  I'll be a Linux SysAdmin in Okemos on Monday. 

Planned change of course.  Time to leave Metro Detroit.

Any clues as to who for?

Largest tech outfit that I know of in Okemos is Techsmith, but they're a windows shop as far as I know.
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #25 on: June 19, 2013, 09:53:33 AM »
I think you'll like Okemos. I live there.

Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2013, 10:38:59 AM »
I think you'll like Okemos. I live there.

I think we should have a luncheon for the highly unofficial Lansing Chapter of Geeks with Guns.
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Offline linux203

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2013, 12:28:42 PM »
I think you'll like Okemos. I live there.

We are looking at the Holt area.  Houses are less expensive, therefore taxes are less.  Both sets of parents are in Jackson, so my kids will be able to see the grandparents easier. 

I think we should have a luncheon for the highly unofficial Lansing Chapter of Geeks with Guns.

Sounds like an idea.  I don't know what the stance is on firearms and if the handbook includes premise.  If its during the week, I might not be able to carry.
When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are in peace. Luke 11:21

Then He said to them, “But now, he who has a money bag, let him take it, and likewise a knapsack; and he who has no sword, let him sell his garment and buy one."  Luke 22:36

Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #28 on: June 19, 2013, 03:36:22 PM »
We are looking at the Holt area.  Houses are less expensive, therefore taxes are less.  Both sets of parents are in Jackson, so my kids will be able to see the grandparents easier. 

Sounds like an idea.  I don't know what the stance is on firearms and if the handbook includes premise.  If its during the week, I might not be able to carry.

Dimondale isn't too bad either, but the downside is that it's on the other side of town (albeit quite close to 69 and 96).
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Offline TheQ

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Who works in IT
« Reply #29 on: June 19, 2013, 03:42:16 PM »

Scratch that... Friday is my last day.  I'll be a Linux SysAdmin in Okemos on Monday. 

Planned change of course.  Time to leave Metro Detroit.

We do need a Lansing area coordinator for MOC.....
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Offline SD40VE

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2013, 10:55:24 AM »
hello all!

i am in the IT field. currently working for a firm that does network/system installs/support/configurations for dental offices in the midwest. we also do kodak xray work for dental practices as well. i am an avid OC'er and live in northern macomb county. maybe we support your dentist :) anyways glad to see so many much like myself in a field ruled by "nerds" newsflash nerds + guns = cool :)

Offline TheQ

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Who works in IT
« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2013, 01:59:22 PM »
Our IT director is always looking for talent. Interested persons can email him at it@miopencarry.org.
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Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #32 on: November 26, 2013, 02:51:37 PM »
Our IT director is always looking for talent. Interested persons can email him at it@miopencarry.org.

I was actually talking with Tom about maybe having an IT working group of sorts. Still have the director, but have multiple people that can work on stuff
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Offline TheQ

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Who works in IT
« Reply #33 on: November 26, 2013, 03:15:09 PM »

I was actually talking with Tom about maybe having an IT working group of sorts. Still have the director, but have multiple people that can work on stuff

That's the idea!

Email the IT team if you're interested in helping out.
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #34 on: November 26, 2013, 03:39:26 PM »
Anything we can do IT related would help gun owners, OCers, and MOC.  Expand the website, have online apps, references, databases, etc. Develop Android and iPhone apps.

IT stuff is fun and useful.  It would promote OC and MOC!

Offline SD40VE

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #35 on: November 26, 2013, 04:07:14 PM »
Anything we can do IT related would help gun owners, OCers, and MOC.  Expand the website, have online apps, references, databases, etc. Develop Android and iPhone apps.

IT stuff is fun and useful.  It would promote OC and MOC!

those arent my area of expertise but if there is anything i can contribute to. such as beta testing of apps. i would be fine with that.

Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #36 on: November 26, 2013, 05:18:50 PM »
Anything we can do IT related would help gun owners, OCers, and MOC.  Expand the website, have online apps, references, databases, etc. Develop Android and iPhone apps.

IT stuff is fun and useful.  It would promote OC and MOC!

One thing I was thinking of was having a searchable list of "local authorities" that fall under preemption based on location/zip/etc
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Offline TheQ

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Who works in IT
« Reply #37 on: November 26, 2013, 06:23:21 PM »

One thing I was thinking of was having a searchable list of "local authorities" that fall under preemption based on location/zip/etc

"All of them?"
I Am Not A Lawyer (nor a gunsmith).

Offline karudin

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #38 on: January 01, 2014, 08:55:59 AM »
Network Engineer here, I deal mostly with Cisco Phone system products. I work for a company based out of Maryland, my boss is in Florida, and I get to work/relax from home here in MI.

Offline Xpiatio

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #39 on: January 01, 2014, 02:43:39 PM »
I don't work in IT, I work in MI.


I'm a web applications developer and a windows application developer for a global Christian non-profit in Grand Rapids.

Offline CV67PAT

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #40 on: January 01, 2014, 02:45:47 PM »
I don't work in IT, I work in MI.


I'm a web applications developer and a windows application developer for a global Christian non-profit in Grand Rapids.
I don't work. Just ask my foreman. Or my ex-wife.
Want to keep informed of events in your area? Go to http://www.miopencarry.org/update

Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #41 on: January 02, 2014, 08:11:16 AM »
Network Engineer here, I deal mostly with Cisco Phone system products. I work for a company based out of Maryland, my boss is in Florida, and I get to work/relax from home here in MI.

Unified Communications // Call Manager?
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Offline SD40VE

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #42 on: January 02, 2014, 08:36:09 AM »
Network Engineer here, I deal mostly with Cisco Phone system products. I work for a company based out of Maryland, my boss is in Florida, and I get to work/relax from home here in MI.

i need one of those work at home jobs. :(

Offline karudin

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #43 on: January 02, 2014, 09:31:01 AM »
Unified Communications // Call Manager?

Indeed. Call manager, Contact Center, Unity/Unity Connection, Emergency Responder, etc... Also have to deal with the networking equipment also, just not as much.

Offline jgillmanjr

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Re: Who works in IT
« Reply #44 on: January 02, 2014, 10:12:47 AM »
Indeed. Call manager, Contact Center, Unity/Unity Connection, Emergency Responder, etc... Also have to deal with the networking equipment also, just not as much.

Although not directly, I do have to deal with Call Manager for my 'Weekend job'.

Also, much of the time, the calls we make will bounce off a satellite :)
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