Author Topic: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market  (Read 18927 times)

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Offline gryphon

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Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« on: July 10, 2013, 03:09:16 AM »
DETROIT – The 2014 Corvette Stingray will deliver up to an EPA-estimated 17 miles per gallon in the city, and 29 mpg on the highway, making the new Stingray the most fuel efficient sports car on the market as no other car offers more than 455 horsepower and greater than 29 mpg highway.



“The Corvette Stingray establishes the benchmark for modern performance cars by using technologies to deliver more performance and more miles per gallon,” said Tadge Juechter, executive chief engineer for the Corvette. “We expect more and more performance cars will follow Corvette’s example.”

The EPA estimate of 17 city and 29 highway is for the Corvette Stingray equipped with an all-new, seven-speed manual transmission. The estimate reflects an average of fuel economy in both the default “Tour” mode, which delivers 28 mpg highway, and driver-selectable “Eco” mode, which delivers 30 mpg highway. For Stingrays equipped with the seven-speed manual transmission, Eco mode enables Active Fuel Management, which disables four of the cylinders for improved fuel economy during light engine loads.

For Corvette Stingrays equipped with the six-speed automatic, Active Fuel Management is active in all drive modes until the driver engages the manual-shift mode using the steering-wheel paddles. Fuel economy estimates for Corvette Stingrays equipped with the six-speed automatic will be finalized soon.

The highway rating represents an 11-percent increase in fuel economy over the previous Corvette, while the all-new 6.2L LT1 V-8 delivers 455 horsepower, a 6-percent increase over the previous Corvette. The LT1 delivers 460 horsepower with the available dual-mode exhaust.

By comparison, the Porsche 911 Carrera S delivers 400 horsepower, and an EPA-estimated 27 mpg highway.

Sports cars with more than 455 horsepower typically offer significantly lower highway fuel economy estimates than the Corvette Stingray. For example, the Jaguar F-Type S offers 495 hp and 23 mpg highway while the Audi R8 V10 offers 510 hp and 19 mpg highway.

Sports cars that deliver more than 29 mpg highway based on EPA estimates typically deliver significantly less engine output. For example, the Porsche Cayman offers 30 mpg and 275 hp while the BMW Z4 sDrive28 delivers 34 mpg and 241 hp.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 06:00:28 PM by gryphon »

Offline TheQ

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Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2013, 09:26:38 AM »
Cool. Do we know anyone who worked on this engineering marvel?
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Offline CV67PAT

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2013, 11:13:19 PM »
That has to be the best looking Vette ever.
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2013, 01:28:38 AM »
That has to be the best looking Vette ever.

I'm not 100% sure I'd agree, but having said that, I will be selling mine and buying a new Stingray.







Offline JaccFrost

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2013, 02:11:41 AM »
That is the first Corvette I have ever been interested in, I feel they have stepped it up.
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2013, 03:57:12 AM »
I feel they have stepped it up.

They have.  I've had the opportunity to interact with it first hand.  Sadly I can't tell you that I've taken one out on the track. 

Worth a watch if you've never seen it.



And if you're into (exciting) propaganda...


Offline gryphon

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2013, 02:40:55 AM »
10 Awesome Things You Need to Know About the C7 Corvette
Car and Driver



Blending economics and emotion is a tricky business, and when Chevrolet began prepping the new C7 Corvette, it knew the development process would be one of give and take, where even the tiniest decisions could have far-reaching implications for the car. With our first full test of the C7 coming soon, here’s a taste of some of those decisions made real.



As with our “Five Awesome Things You Didn’t Know About the Camaro Z/28” brief from earlier this year, the Corvette C7 information collected here was sourced via official GM channels and by relentlessly pestering anyone even tangentially involved with project. So soak it up, and then go forth and drop knowledge on some fools.



1. The C7 marks the first use of a “shape memory alloy wire” in a production vehicle.

To save weight (approximately 1.1 pounds) and reduce complexity, the new Corvette uses a smart material wire to operate a cabin vent in the cargo area that required a motorized actuator on previous models. Triggered by the opening of the hatch, heat generated by an electrical current similar to that of an interior courtesy lamp is used to contract a wire, thereby moving a lever that opens the vent, letting air escape to reduce cabin pressure and make shutting the lid easier. Once the hatch is closed, the current cuts off, the wire returns to its original shape, and a return spring closes the vent to maintain cabin temperature.

GM has earned 247 patents for smart materials such as this over five years of research and development, and it figures there are approximately 200 motorized systems in the typical vehicle that could be replaced with smart materials. Typically made of copper-aluminum-nickel or nickel-titanium, smart materials can change their shape, strength, and/or stiffness when acted upon by heat, stress, a magnetic field, or voltage, and return to their original shape when the trigger is deactivated.



2. The C7 is the first-ever production Corvette with a rear weight bias.

Although Chevrolet claims a straight-up 50/50 weight distribution, our scales demonstrated a rearward weight bias, with 49.4 percent sitting over the front axle and 50.6 to the rear. And, yes, we’re aware the C6.R competition Corvette also tipped the scales to the stern; we’re talking strictly production models.



3. The C7's eLSD (electronic limited-slip differential) goes from open to full lock in tenths of a second.

Dubbed eLSD in GM speak, the suggestively named diff comes standard with the Z51 Performance Package, and employs a hydraulically actuated clutch that infinitely varies the amount of engagement, going from open to full lock in tenths of a second. Fully integrated with the stability-control and Performance Traction Management systems, the system controls the differential according to an algorithm that factors in vehicle speed, steering input, and throttle position.



4. Corvettes equipped with an automatic transmission or Z51 Performance Package get functional vents and rear-mounted transmission and differential heat exchangers.

Multiple heat exchangers are a given in this segment. What’s notable about the C7's are their rear mounting positions, which moves weight rearward and eliminates some of the plumbing (and likely shaves some pounds) in comparison to the C6 pieces. The vent on the driver’s side rear fender directs air over the transmission heat exchanger, while the corresponding vent on the other side directs air over the eLSD cooler. Both exhale the air through aircraft-inspired taillamp vents and outlets in the lower rear fascia.

5. A NASA-developed insulation called Aerogel is used on the transmission tunnel.

Many owners concur that the center tunnel in the C6 can get toasty, and with the C7 now locating the exhaust in an even tighter space, the potential to exacerbate the problem is very real. To combat this, Chevrolet is using insulation made from Aerogel, a material developed by NASA for use in space suits. Considered for years to be the lightest solid material in existence, Aerogel is 99.8 percent air (thereby replacing the liquid portion of a gel with a gas), yet it insulates 39 times better than the best fiberglass. The C7’s tunnel has a 10-mm (0.4-inch) layer of an automotive grade version of the stuff applied to its sides, and another 5 mm (0.2 inch) on top. Hip, style-conscious owners may want to wear vintage space-suit pants whenever possible.

6. $50K was the price target from the beginning.

From day one, Chevrolet was eyeing $50K for the C7’s base price. Targets change, but considering the amount of tech (including new seats!) packed into the C7, drawing the final line at $51,995—just $1400 more than the 2013 C6—is more than impressive. It no doubt required some sharp pencils and tough decisions, but it’s difficult to tell where pennies were pinched. Bravo.



7. It’s the 30-mpg supercar.

You may have missed the recent news that the C7 earned an official EPA highway estimate of 29 mpg, and that it will actually return 30 mpg on the highway cycle with Eco mode selected, which enables the small-block V-8's cylinder-deactivation system. GM claims direct injection, active fuel management, variable valve timing, and an advanced combustion process all help achieve this efficiency. It helps that the Corvette team put in serious work, too: The engine alone underwent more than 10 million hours of computational analysis, including more than 6 million hours on the combustion system.



8. No more cross-drilled rotors.

Equipped with Brembo brakes, the C7 ditches cross-drilled rotors for new discs vented by means of shallow grooves. Race teams were reporting cracking issues with the drilled units, while the new setup also maintains the benefit of better brake feel versus solid rotors, as the gasses don’t push back against the pads.



9. It wears some pretty special shoes.

Partner Michelin was selected as the OEM supplier for C7 rubber after a tire-company shootout, and it worked directly with the Corvette team for 36 months to create tires for the base car and the Z51 package. Michelin characterizes the resultant Pilot Super Sport ZP footwear as a cross between two of its best models, the PS2 and the PS Cup. The rubber is also among the world’s first street meat to be engineered using the exact same computer models used to create tires for Le Mans and ALMS racers, and incorporates many of the same rubber mixes in its construction.

10. The tires feature asymmetrical sidewalls.

Michelin has employed asymmetrical sidewalls since the first ZR1 run-flat radials, and this technology continues in C7. The inside walls of the tires are 3 mm (0.12 inch) thicker and molded with a stiffer construction to optimize comfort and cornering adhesion characteristics. The new Michelin radials also have 150 different constituents in their tread compounds.

http://blog.caranddriver.com/10-awesome-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-c7-corvette/

Offline harleyh77

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2013, 12:53:30 PM »
I will take one in yellow please!
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2013, 09:29:31 PM »
Top Gear: http://www.topgear.com/uk/car-news/chevrolet-corvette-stingray-first-drive-2013-08-19

Is that the new Corvette?

Yep, but it's not called the Corvette anymore. For 2014 it's now the Corvette Stingray.

What, so it's got two names?

Yes again. But that's not an entirely new thing. Chevrolet has used the Stingray name before on previous versions of the ‘Vette. If you want to win the pub quiz with this one, it was known as the Corvette Sting Ray from '63-67 - the C2 version - and as the Corvette Stingray from '69-'76 - the middle of the C3 version - and now again in 2014.

What's all this C2 and C3 business about?

The C denotes the generation of the Corvette. A bit like Dr Who (without the Daleks and Cybermen), the car has been through six rebirths since it was launched in 1953, so there are six generations. The launch of this new car is the seventh iteration of the Vette, so it's known as the C7.

OK, so you're telling me that it's old enough to be the Viper's dad?

I am. But let's not dwell on any other comparisons between the two cars yet. Well, maybe just a couple to give you the picture. Sales of the Viper total under 2,000 a year. Sales of the 'Vette regularly top 12,000, so the big SRT is a much more limited-run car. The other thing to consider is price. The Viper starts at $97,395 while the base version of the Corvette starts at $51,995. There will be pricier versions of the 'Vette later, but for now it's really not worth comparing the two.

What versions are going to be available from launch then?

There are going to be two available from day one: the base car, which isn't really base as it's so loaded with tech and spec; and the Z51, which adds a pack of go-faster goodies that you should consider an essential option as all of them make the car even better. There are a number of optional extras that need to be considered, too.

So what's new about the C7 Corvette?

It's probably easier to talk about what isn't new than what is, as the new car only shares two parts with the previous generation: the cabin air filter and the rear latch for the removable roof panel. But let's jump in and give you a quick rundown of the highlights.

OK...

First up is the all-new interior. This is probably the biggest improvement to the car. Instead of feeling like you are sitting in something made down to a price, it now looks, feels and operates like it's been built to a modern standard. Replacing the previous nasty plastics, it's now all soft touch, good looking stuff accented with real leather, aluminium and carbon fibre.

Tell me about some of the new tech on offer.

Nothing short of mind-bending. But the good news is it's all relatively simple to access. There are two eight-inch hi-def screens to access all the info plus a single rotary drive mode selector that allows you to change between the 'Vette's five modes - Weather, Eco, Tour (the default), Sport and Track - and the car's set up in an instant. You don't have to mess around with sub menus, the car just adjusts 12 of its parameters to suit the conditions.

What, it thinks for you?

Kind of, yeah. The new 'Vette has tyre temperature monitors which feed this key information into the car's central brain, which adjusts everything from traction control to the electronic rear diff (on the Z51) according to the grip available. If you also spec the active damping system there aren't switches to change its mode, it just adapts to whatever driving conditions you happen to be doing at that instant. Likewise, the gauges adapt, too. When the engine is new or the oil is cold, the tacho will lower the redline until the engine warms up, to stop you over revving it.

Cool. What else is new?

Loads. We have only just scratched the surface so far. So I'm going to be brief or we'll be here all day. We are going to be doing stacks more in-depth coverage of this car online and in the magazine, so we'll get it all to you soon. But for now, deep breath, here we go.

Mechanically, the highlights include an active rev match feature on the seven speed manual gearbox that spookily predicts which gear you are going to select next - using a sensor in the base of the gearlever - and then matching the engine revs to the road speed. You can turn it on and off using one of two steering wheel mounted paddles and, once you get used to not doing it yourself, it works. There's also a six-speed automatic (in the US only) if you can't be bothered.

And the engine?

The new 455bhp/624 Nm LT1 V8 motor is still a pushrod design - to keep the height of the engine down and preserve the low bonnet height for better vision - but it's loaded with new tech to make it more flexible and efficient. When Eco mode is selected and the car is cruising it shuts down four of the cylinders to save fuel. It makes the engine sound a bit funny but it allows the Vette to hit almost 30mpg.

Both the bonnet and removable roof panel are now made of carbon fibre on all models, the frame is wrought from aluminium, and the doors and rear quarter panels are made of composite. Together they help give the 1,499kg C7 a 50:50 front/rear weight balance. The Z51 package adds a dry sump, electronic limited slip diff, brake, diff and transmission cooling, plus larger wheels, better brakes and some design changes, such as the taller rear lid spoiler to aid high-speed stability.

Is there going be a convertible version?

Yes, one is on the way. It has a latchless fabric hood and an ability to put it up while travelling at up to 30mph. But why you'd want that when the standard car has a removable and easily stowable roof panel is questionable.

The design looks different - what's happened to the trademark round rear taillights?

Good spot. The C7 has evolved the 'Vette design in many ways, giving it echoes of 500 series Ferraris - around the nose and roof - and the Nissan GT-R thanks to the diagonal wing vents, depending on where you are standing and the colour schemes chosen. But the single biggest change is the switch from round rear lights to the slashes on the new car. The added angularity of the body and lighting works to make the car feel more modern, but it's going to be a personal thing whether you like it or not.

$64,000 question - what's it like to drive?

In a word: stunning. What the 'Vette team has managed to achieve with the C7 is nothing short of astonishing. You basically get three cars in one. It will comfortably cruise all day, mopping up bumps, sipping fuel and generally letting you go about your business without getting in the way. You'd be happy commuting in it. Equally it has the performance - and luggage space under the rear hatch - to handle long journeys with ease. But the really special bit is, without touching anything more than the chassis set up dial, you can take it to a track and have hours of fun, too.

There's stacks of grip at both ends, the adjustable steering communicates really well when you want it to and fades away when you don't, the chassis absorbs changes of input from the road and driver without issue. And, best of all, it's all massively entertaining in the process. Unlike a lot of high performance cars which don't give you much feedback until the limit, you really feel like you can thrash the C7 and get all the value out of it at all speeds.

So should I buy one then?

If you've ever thought about a 'Vette, now is the time. By thoroughly updating the car the C7 team have vaulted to the front of the wave of modern two-seater sportscars. There really isn't anything else on the market that does as much as this car can do for even twice the price.

The numbers
6,162cc, 8cyl, RWD, 455bhp, 624Nm, 23mpg, CO2 n/a, 0-60mph 3.8secs, 190mph, 1499kg

Price
From $51,000 (+ $995 destination)

Offline gryphon

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2013, 09:31:46 PM »

Offline gryphon

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2013, 09:33:09 PM »
WSJ: Corvette, the Next Generation, Is a Superstar

Corvette Stingray: An Affordable World-Class Supercar

excerpts:

TO CUT TO THE CHASE: The newly redesigned, seventh-generation Chevrolet Corvette (C7), aka Stingray, heir to Corvette's 60-year heritage and the bannered spear of a resurgent General Motors, is an excellent car. Fast, authentic, tough as a rodeo steak.

Set aside the C7's wrathful-dragonfly styling—which only the deranged won't like—or its dead-slinky leather-wrapped cabin with glass-panel avionics and configurable graphics, or the vastly improved driver's seat. Look down the barrel of this thing: 460 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque out of a 6.2-liter, naturally aspirated direct-injection, midfront-mounted aluminum pushrod V8; the weird-but-wonderful seven-speed Tremec manual gearbox with active rev-matching; and a rear transaxle with limited-slip differential and electronic torque vectoring. All that is bolted to a new, all-aluminum, glued-and-machine-welded monocoque, replacing the C6's steel chassis, and is 100 pounds lighter and more than 50% stiffer.

This is pretty much the technology Scaglietti uses to build the monocoque of the Ferrari 458 (except that car has a stressed aluminum skin); Aston Martin, Jaguar, and Lotus use something similar. Corvette doubters are going to have to show me a better mass-production chassis that is priced anything like a new Stingray.

Code, you want code? In order to better calibrate the behavior of the various adaptive driving modes (weather, eco, tour, sport and track)—modulating no less than 12 vehicle systems including the electric steering and magnetic adaptive dampers—the Stingray Z51's 19- and 20-inch wheels (front/rear) are fitted with tiny temperature sensors, because warm tires behave differently than cold tires. But because these sensing thermocouples heat up more slowly than the air inside the tires, their signals go through a special temperature-estimating algorithm before they are processed by the driving-mode head office.



Topping the agenda for the C7 redesign was bringing the cockpit instruments and amenities into the modern age. Done and done. The optional stitched-leather upholstery is couture-soft, with elegantly graphic seams that flow around the cabin and define the driver-centric, twin-cowl layout. The Stingray—now one word instead of the historical two—features two large panel displays, one a navi/audio touch screen in the center stack, the other in the instrument panel, with adaptive graphics that fly in and out of view depending on driving mode and the driver customization. Carbon-fiber dash fascia, burnished metal trim and fresh switchgear also gussy up the place.

Other ergonomic notes: Thanks in part to the LT1 pushrod V8's compactness in the vertical axis, the Stingray's sculpted hood is able to slope away dramatically from the base of the windshield, improving forward sight lines.

Number hungry? Here are some performance figures for the box-stock Stingray Z51: 0-60 mph in 3.8 seconds, ¼-mile pace of 12.0 seconds; in excess of 1-g lateral acceleration (cornering grip); 60-0 mph in 107 feet; a top speed of 190 mph. The Z51 (which is $2,800 extra) with the Track Pack weighs 3,290 pounds. Those numbers put the Stingray snout-to-snout with the Porsche 911 Carrera S with PDK and the deliriously caddish Jaguar F-Type V8, while costing roughly $30,000 less than either. I assure you the Porsche and Jaguar people aren't amused.

It carries four golf bags. Its exhaust burbles with debonair masculinity at moderate speeds and, when the sport exhaust's bypass valves are open, it roars and cackles like Satan in Faust.

With the C7, Chevrolet has hit the Reset button with a sledgehammer. I think it is a great car, and I'm proud it is an American product. So there!

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323608504579025082163642134.html

Offline TheQ

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Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2013, 10:02:51 PM »
At 455 HP, it's hardly a supercar. That's like calling a Geo Metro a sportscar.

The Veyron -- that's a supercar!

Does it cone as a Manual Teansmission?
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Offline TheQ

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Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2013, 10:06:42 PM »
I should note: my 2 liter makes 290. Calling a 6.2  L (over three times the displacement) that makes 455 an engineering marvel is a bit of a stretch. Charge it to 20 PSI and then let's talk.
I Am Not A Lawyer (nor a gunsmith).

Offline gryphon

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2013, 10:23:45 PM »
Does it come as a Manual Teansmission?

The C7 is available with either a manual transmission or an automatic with paddle shift.

Yeah, supercar may be a bit of a superlative.  That was what was stated in the WSJ video.  :)  But it is affordable.  I don't know many people that can afford a $1.7M - $2.7M Veyron.  :o

« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 10:30:52 PM by gryphon »

Offline TheQ

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Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #14 on: August 27, 2013, 11:06:35 AM »
It takes 4 times the HP to go twice as fast (fact of physics). It takes 4 times the $ to double HP (fact of the market).
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Offline gryphon

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #15 on: November 22, 2013, 12:47:01 PM »
Some of y'all may enjoy this.


Offline Jeff

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2013, 02:27:43 PM »
Yeah it sucks having car dreams then waking up next to a dead hooker.

Offline gryphon

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2013, 03:03:59 PM »
LOL

Hit full screen and turn on your 5.1.

Offline gryphon

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Corvette hits 200 mph on Texas tollway
« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2013, 11:19:44 PM »








The newly completed Grand Parkway toll road section got quite the test run this week as Hennessey Performance brought their 2014 Corvette Stingray over to test the toll system. On a closed portion of the tollway, Texas DPS State Troopers clocked the speedster at 200.6 mph, making it the first 2014 Corvette to break the 200 mph barrier.

“The road is perfectly smooth and the Corvette was very stable and easy to drive at 200 mph,” said driver and company founder John Hennessey. “I’d put the Texas highway system up against any other highway in the world, including the German Autobahn. Our roads have proven to be smooth and safe at speeds well above 200 mph.”

The Parkway section, which connects Interstate 10 with Highway 290, will open to the public on Dec. 21 and just in case anyone gets any ideas, the toll road cameras were still able to get crystal clear images of the Stingray’s plates as it blazed through the toll section.

Check out the test run:



http://blog.chron.com/carsandtrucks/2013/12/corvette-hits-200-mph-on-texas-tollway/

(If you notice, the driver let off the throttle once he reached 200 MPH.  Speed was still slowly climbing).

Offline part deux

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Re: Corvette Stingray Most Efficient Sports Car on the Market
« Reply #19 on: December 19, 2013, 08:49:38 PM »
Hennessey... bad news

Only one self proclaimed expert worse than they are, and that's the Mustang guy... name escapes me right now.